Saturday, 25 April 2009

What's Your Theological Worldview?

What's my theological world view?

Apparently I am an Emergent/Postmodern, according to the quiz I took on http://www.quizfarm.com/ :


"You are Emergent/Postmodern in your theology. You feel alienated from older forms of church, you don't think they connect to modern culture very well. No one knows the whole truth about God, and we have much to learn from each other, and so learning takes place in dialogue. Evangelism should take place in relationships rather than through crusades and altar-calls. People are interested in spirituality and want to ask questions, so the church should help them to do this".

The results scored were:
Emergent/Postmodern
82%
Evangelical/Holiness/Wesleyan
71%
Neo orthodox
64%
Modern Liberal
36%
Roman Catholic
36%
Reformed Evangelical
32%
Classical Liberal
32%
Charismatic/Pentecostal
29%
Fundamentalist
0%

Well, I must say that was pretty good for a quiz - mostly correct! Though I was surprised that I was more Roman Catholic 36% than Reformed Evangelical 32%, but not surprised to be Emergent/Post Modern (82%). For a bit more on how I see Emergent/Post Modern theology see http://www.freewebs.com/faithandreason/apps/blog/show/872196-theological-worldview-2 & http://www.freewebs.com/faithandreason/apps/blog/show/next?from_id=872196-theological-worldview-2

Actually, I think I'm a nominal Christian, willing to work with all peoples of all faiths, or none, to improve society in the best way I can; as James 2:20, 24, 26 makes clear, faith without works is useless for both the believer and society. I believe in working for civil rights for all, regardless of nationality status, sexuality, gender, religion, age, race, disability or intellect. I believe in working to keep health and education available to all, regardless of ones ability to pay for it. I believe that the state has an obligation to its people, whether it is a secular or theocratic state, and that means welfare provision and the development with, or without, other agencies to provide social housing for those who either cannot afford it or who are in need of special housing; my faith exhorts me to look after the poor and needy, the down trodden and the outcast, that means supporting policies and agencies that try to implement such provision. And I believe that the armed forces should be equipped and provided for, both whilst in service and afterwards; my faith does not allow me to turn from those who are fighting, even if I disagree with why they are fighting. Men and women who lay down their lives (even if its expected of them because that is their vocation) for others deserve respect and honour, even if you or I disagree with why they are fighting. That does not mean that other groups such as the education and nursing profession and all others that are involved, the police, the firemen and women do not deserve respect and honour, they do.

As a Christian I am called to love my neighbour as myself. I can only do that by appreciating and supporting what others do in 'helping' and 'providing' for other people - all the people in our society - and respecting them and their efforts in doing what they do. I can only do that by reaching out to others to offer friendship, fellowship, help and assistance the best way I can. I might disagree with their lifestyle, their politics, their theological worldview or their atheism or agnosticism, but they have a right to their life and viewpoint, be it secular or religious. How I live my life amongst other people is important. Why I live my life the way I do has a background to it. How I interact with others is dictated by my faith. I believe that how I am seen to interact with others is an indictment for or against my faith. If that is part and parcel of being a Emergent / Postmodern Christian, then I guess that's what I am Fish 2

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